Skip to main content

About your Search

20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17
with. the presiding officer: without objection. the senator from california. mrs. boxer: mr. president, i have listened to the senator from ohio, and i really want to be heard because he's talking about the fiscal cliff and how upset he is at the thought that the wealthiest people in america might go back to the tack rates we had under bill clinton when we had the greatest prosperity, we had 23 million new jobs, and we balanced the budget to the point where we even had a surplus. and my friend comes down here and he's complaining that the proposal on the table would give 98% of the people a tax cut, and he's upset that 2% of the people might have to go back to the rates under bill clinton. well, i just want to say something. we just had an election. we had a big election. we had a tough election. we had an expensive election. and one of the major parts of that election revolved around what do we do about the deficits, what do we do about economic growth, what do we do about spending, and we discussed it in the senate races, we discussed it in the house races, and of course president ob
incredibly well here. in california, that is not an issue. it is not a tradition there. but if they can look and say, okay, in order to be a valuable local democratic process, something needs to be inclusive and deliberative and it needs to be empowered. that provides enough of a framework for people to say, all right, we don't have to have town meetings and all apples. we can have oranges. the people can take that inspiration and use it from wherever they are so that the democratic possibilities why is it locally. in some ways, that can have an impact on the national conversation. >> vermont became a state in 1791 and since that time, it has become the largest producer of maple syrup in the united states and one of the blur discredit producers in the country. it is also rich in history and literary culture. over the course of her recent visit with the help of our cable partner, comcast, booktv brings you many interviews with local authors. you can watch a few of those now. >> here we go. i am paul carnahan. this is margarete strawn. we are in the vermont history center. we have a photo albu
wasn't married, i lived in live in washington dc, i moved to california. i was married for a wild in california. then i moved to washington and i wasn't married again. now, i am about to be married again. [laughter] thank you. >> hopefully this same guy? [laughter] >> yes, we can't forget that. >> yes, you don't get gifts every time either. that's a problem. [laughter] so i did have this very -- i certainly had a personal stake in that. so i was very proud and 10 pleasantly surprised on that front. i also want to look at this deeper. but it feels to me like this time the disconnect between the voting was not as big as it had been in the past. suggesting that people were saying different things. it feels like in this race, the polling suggested that that was kind of the margin and we won by a margin and we were fairly close to the polling. i think if that is true, it's very good news for us as we go forward with this kind of thing. i think there was a tendency for us to feel that we really had to get very high numbers. so that was good news in my world. >> the staff said one thing,
their campuses safer. states from california to florida have introduced legislation to make it clear that child abuse reporting is not only a moral duty, but it's the law. this is tremendous progress. laws strengthens, policies tightened, governance revisited, and institutions made safer, and our work continues. that brings us to today, on the brink of the one year anniversary, civil lawsuits, perjury trials, and we can expect more fallout to come. over the last year, we have learned much about ourselves, our many cultures, our values, and our vision. we're still working through some difficult issues, but the question remains where do we go from here? the answer can be found by returning to penn state's core mission -- teaching, research, and service. our bottom line is delivering an outstanding education to students. our students are our top priority. i repeat, our students are our top priority, and they are doing great things. for example, this year, our journalism students captured the national championship in the william randolff hurst journalism award. engineering students took top honors
's the question. to my good friend from california, i don't want anyone to believe that under the law of war construct that we have created over the last seven or eight years, that you can be put in jail because you look like a muslim, that you sound like a muslim, that you have got a name muhammad. what happened to japanese american citizens, they were put in military custody because we were all afraid and they looked like the enemy. that was not a high point in america. what are we talking about here? we're talking about detaining people under the law of war who are suspected of joining al qaeda of the taliban in engaging in a belligerent act against the united states. now, i want to make the record clear that some of my colleagues on the republican side have been trying to deny law of war detention to the obama administration, and they have openly said this. if you allow this to happen, president obama is going to put you in jail because of political dissent. there are people on my side who are afraid of law of war detention being in barack obama's hand because they think -- they hate him
and kirkpatrick democratic candidate and jonathan hunton, a republican event in california 26th district also the democratic when julie of the tony strickland, the republican, and then also michigan first dan, the republican in a four way race is the victor in michigan first district. those are some of the races that have been called. there are a few other out standing once. go to our website come c-span.org, and then also as i told you yesterday in the presidential race, in florida has yet to be called here is the absentee ballot voting delay to push right on the floor of the election. we don't know where the 29 electoral votes will go but have made every outcome of the presidential election. back to the topic here. what was your message to washington? a lot of newspaper articles this morning about the fiscal the cliff and that is what faces -- >> we will leave this portion of this morning's washington journal now to go live to the american enterprise institute for panel discussions on the election with fox news channel commentator michael barone, inside out columnist norman borkenstein and
are not an outlet. we are a program at the university of california, a graduate program that does reporting, but we are working with different organizations. we do not really have an initiative, per said, but there are organizations that are doing incredible work with citizens. "the guardian" in the u.k. is the best example of a large organization that works with citizens on a huge scale. one of the things they did in the last couple years was pulled from public records about the way their politicians are spending money. millions of documents. they created a form and citizens volunteered to go through those millions of documents and competed. it was amazingly successful. i do not know how many thousands of people participated, but it was a lot. "the guardian" is very innovative. american journalists are trying to find ways to do this -- to engage citizens. we do not get a lot of cold calls or tips, but we never ignore. i do not know if there are journalists out there -- we never ignore a tip. i do not care how crazy it seems, how far-fetched -- we always follow up. you'll be surprised at how many a
, a little california adventure, to mar run county, california, after being in manhattan or brooklyn for 21, 22 years. >> host: why'd you move out there? >> guest: we wanted to try something different. our kids were at a nice age where they were out of diapers, but today didn't yet have girlfriends -- [laughter] and we have three boys. and we have this nice thing where we can kind of live anywhere because we have a lot of flexibility. i don't have to go into a office, my wife -- who used to work at mtv -- isn't working there now. and so -- >> host: may we ask who your wife is? >> guest: my wife is alexa robinson, she was a producer at mtv. she wasn't a vijay. >> host: okay. >> guest: and she -- and so we wanted to try and go on some kind of adventure with the kids to take advantage of the fact that we can live anywhere. and i've always loved northern california, and i have a lot of friends out there. because of all the technology projects that i've been involved with and things that i've written about, you know, it was helpful professionally to be out there for a while. so we've been off on
.c. for a while, moved to california. i was married for a while in california and then i moved to washington and i wasn't married again. and now, i'm about to get married again. [laughter] thank you. >> hopefully to the same guy. [laughter] don't forget that. >> you don't gets gifts every time either. that's the problem. so i did have this very, i certainly had a personal thing in that so i was very pleasantly surprised on that side and i do think that also, i want to look at this, but it feels to me like this time the disconnect between the prior polling in the actual voting wasn't as big as it has in the pass which past which suggests to the extent that people were saying kind of different things to survey takers than they were, if that ever was true, it feels like in this race are polling rejected that which was the margin and we won by the margin close to the polling. i think if that is true that is very good news for us as we go forward with this kind of thing. i think there was a tendency for us to have to feel that we had to really get very high numbers. and so that was good news. >> i was
like georgia and texas and florida and southern california and north carolina, i mean, just think about it. this. from 1964 to 2008, it is a period -- a president elected from those years from 1964 to 2008, they were from the sun belt states. jimmy carter from georgia. ronald reagan from california. it ends this forty-year period. there were issues that were critical in the politics that developed. it tended to be oriented around issues of strong national defense and in opposition to unions and the defense of free enterprise policy. also it is in the sun belt, the south and southwest of the see the sunrise of the 1970s to talk about the religious right. the rise of evangelical and fundamentalist voters. national defense, he was a staunch economist who played an important role in populist politics in the late 50s and early 1960s. one of the things that led this to switch parties in 1964. he was opposing labor unions.
weak a sniper school not in training in bridgeport, california. following pairs foundation of north carolina for infantry training. after that i went off to hawaii for the next four years. and this is where i also went to sniper school. so after attending sniper school, quickly shipped off to iraq. i didn't get to complete my tour because i was bitten on my right hand by an enemy spider and i suffered severe nerve damage. i want to let everyone in this room know that the enemy will stop at nothing. they even train their spiders to guide us. so he turned back on for two years of additional training and trying to get my head back and this is when i became a sniper team leader charging five other marines and their out of mojave viper, training to go back to iraq. nick dennis archer what can said we need five volunteers to go to afghanistan. a separate submission? he said we don't know. just a 25 volunteers had appeared a race by hand and said to go. i ended up being assigned to small team of advisers were going to act as advisers to the afghan national army. this is not used in normal
organizations. it also features the involvement of the university of california, just working with local communities to rethink and refrain perceptions and understanding of neighborhood security personnel and he would security. there are a lot of, you know, bottom-up approach is to changing the securities sector. we see some of these efforts, important efforts happening in addition to the high-level policy stuff that we have been discussing, such as the police for each ship initiative. >> thank you. i don't know. okay. let's take this as our final question. i have one more very last question to pose to our panel before we break. >> i am independent researcher and consultant. so my question is the same primarily of bob. you know, of course mentioning his paper and highlighted the problems of the challenges. the light footprint, not come so or afghanistan. thousands, if not tens of hundreds of thousands of people on the ground appeal to push the democratization and the ss are forward. so i guess my question, what our considerations are when we engage. what can we do during the conflict to
communities. in vermont we have town meetings and they work incredibly well here but in california that is not a decision and their decisions people can build on. if they can say okay well, in order to be really a valuable local democratic process, something needs to be inclusive and deliberate advantage to be empowered. that provides enough of a framework to people to say, look, here is how we can do it in our area. we don't have to have town meetings and apples like they do in vermont. we can have oranges are some or some other process so people can take that inspiration and use it from wherever they are so that the democratic possibility to rise up locally and hopefully i think in some ways i can have an impact on the national conversation.
to regulate the means of production of our agriculture products. a state like california might be fine that has defined a is coming to california shall be raised by hansen student cage size. start out being free range. nancy pelosi impose free range hens from exum re- -- in the captors in the building is remember. that california agenda violates the commerce clause of the constitution that where interstate commerce is regulate exclusively by congress, not the state. and our founding fathers understood but it needs to be stuck. i did put an amendment on the farm bill called the pike and mimic to protect interstate commerce an amendment which prohibits the states from regulating the means of production of our act product but there's a list that exists in the code. so that takes the states like california and arizona and florida out of the business of telling us, and iowa, how we're going to raise hands and produce eggs and how we're going to raise cattle and raise hogs. that's an important piece that as many fight in this campaign to go to have a lot of play in the press but that somethi
is the place. and highly mobile labor pool. california and texas in vermont have to have some sense, some common basis of knowledge. the national governors' association, a local initiative, i hope we have more discussion how to make certain implements. >> when you talk about self-esteem, working in the united kingdom. a kenna-12 system goes to the heart of it. the deep belief we need to develop a kid at self-esteem so she can perform. we need to reverse that and tell people they need to perform in order to have self-esteem. it is critically important, elevating standards is important. three things have the potential they are not easy to achieve, but could change the system. if i could wave a wand tomorrow i would make a-12 teachers america's heroes. they would be the profession we all aspire to. they would be seen in places like japan where they call teachers since reflecting what they call lawyers, doctors, university professors, the difference between we view university professors in america and the way we view k-12 teachers and places like finland have this right and we haven't 100% wr
pipeline, particularly in various parts of the country, but i look at california where we have such immense success. two women senators. we have a freight -- great female delegation out there but we also have folks who have been there for 20 years. many are elected 20 years ago. how long are they going to stay? are we prepared for that? that is our next piece and we will be. >> great. this was sort of a perception in some parts of the country this was a good year for women because a couple of men said a couple of dumb things. dawn, is that true? was this about a couple of men saying a couple of dumb things? >> they did say dumb things, let's be clear but this year of the woman part because i think that goes to it i pick up on your analogy, this year women went viral. the same way the media landscape is fractured. i think you could say this was the year of the woman candidate part two. this was the year of the younger woman. this is the year of the diverse woman. this is the year of women's uteruses. it was a lot of different levels of women got involved in a way that i think 20 years ago it
: a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from california. mrs. boxer: i would ask that the quorum call be dispensed with, please. the presiding officer: without objection. mrs. boxer: thank you so much, mr. president. just in the lull here and if there is any legislative business to take place, i will immediately give up the floor, but in this lull i just want to make a point. i am so proud to be in this senate, so proud to be here for a long time now, came here in 1993, there were two women, we went to six women, now we're going to 20 women and i've seen changes and i've seen good things and i've seen rough things. but i have to say one of the things that keeps coming up continually here is folks trying to use these debates on bills to add irrelevant amendments, amendments that have nothing to do with the topic at hand. i think we all agree that defending our nation is our number-one priority, and therefore having a defense authorization bill is very, very important. and i'm sure that we don't agree with every single sentence of this bill, but in general we all wa
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17